Fisheries

Tom Finn and Sam Kimball, April 22, 2014

Like a spear thrusting into the Gulf of Mexico’s gut, the Isle de Jean Charles is turbulent with ruinous daily oil and gas accidents, rising sea levels, and tropical storms. Homes on the Isle de Jean Charles perch on delicate wooden stilts thirteen feet high, their paint peeling in the sun. A solitary road snakes down the spine of the shrinking island. Stained American flags billow slowly in the Gulf breeze, affixed to porches where one can catch the nasal tones of plaid-clad men bantering in Cajun French.

Jorge Barrera, APTN, August 25, 2017

Indigenous leaders are calling on Fisheries and Oceans Minister Dominic LeBlanc to immediately halt fish farming along British Columbia’s coastal region following the release of video footage showing diseased farmed Atlantic salmon –some blind, others with swollen gills and blisters—swimming through pens thick with fish feces.

, WWF, September 21, 2015

A new report on the health of the ocean finds that the marine vertebrate population has declined by 49 percent between 1970 and 2012.

Robert Scribbler, http://robertscribbler.com/, August 25, 2015

Something lurking in the Northeastern Pacific is killing off the graceful giants of the world’s oceans. For since May of 2015 30 large whales have been discovered dead — their bloated and decaying bodies washed up on Alaskan shores. It’s an unusual mortality event featuring a death rate of nearly 400 percent above the average. So far, scientists don’t yet have a culprit. But there is a prime suspect and it’s one that’s linked to climate change.

Michael McCarthy, The Independent, June 21, 2012

The world's oceans are faced with an unprecedented loss of species comparable to the great mass extinctions of prehistory, a major report suggests today. The seas are degenerating far faster than anyone has predicted, the report says, because of the cumulative impact of a number of severe individual stresses, ranging from climate warming and sea-water acidification, to widespread chemical pollution and gross overfishing.

Alex Renton, Newsweek, July 2, 2014

In the great halls of La Boqueria, Barcelona’s central market, tourists, foodies and cooks gather every day to marvel at the fresh food, like pilgrims at the site of a miracle. The chief shrines are the fish counters, where thousands of sea creatures making up dozens of species gleam pink and gray on mounds of ice.

Dr. Jeremy Jackson, Healthy Planet, May 16, 2014

Dr. Jeremy Jackson is considered one of the world's foremost experts on the human impact on the oceans. This talk is a hard-hitting passionate look on the future of the world's oceans, given overfishing, habitat destruction and ocean warming, which have fundamentally changed marine ecosystems and led to "the rise of slime." Although Jackson's work describes grim circumstances, even garnering him the nickname Dr. Doom, he believes that successful management and conservation strategies can renew the ocean's health.

Andrea Germanos, Common Dreams , May 2, 2014

Scientists have documented how ocean acidification, sometimes referred to as climate change's "evil twin," is already taking a toll on an essential part of the marine food chain in an area off the U.S. northwest coast, and with runaway greenhouse gas emissions continuing, it looks like the problem is only set to worsen.

Larry Pynn, Vancouver Sun, February 19, 2014

VANCOUVER - Water samples from off the B.C. coast have found up to about 9,200 particles of plastic per cubic metre, the director of a new ocean pollution program at the Vancouver Aquarium said Tuesday…

“There is extensive contamination of sea water by microplastics,” confirmed Peter Ross, a former research scientist with the federal Institute of Ocean Sciences in Sidney on Vancouver Island.

 

Mark Hume, Globe and Mail, January 31, 2014

Five bands on the West Coast of Vancouver Island are hailing as "a major legal victory" a decision by the Supreme Court of Canada that confirms the right of native people to fish and to sell their catch. The decision ends a long legal battle and is expected to give First Nations greater opportunities to catch and market salmon, cod, halibut, crab and other species.

 

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