Coal

Rasmus Landström, Verso Books, February 7, 2018

First published at ETC. Translated by Sam Carlshamre.

Michael Klare, TomDispatch.com, July 31, 2017

Who says President Trump doesn’t have a coherent foreign policy?  Pundits and critics across the political spectrum have chided him for failing to articulate and implement a clear international agenda.

Hiroko Tabuchi, New York Times, July 1, 2017

When China halted plans for more than 100 new coal-fired power plants this year, even as President Trump vowed to “bring back coal” in America, the contrast seemed to confirm Beijing’s new role as a leader in the fight against climate change.

Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times, June 1, 2017

BEIJING — Pakistan’s Thar region is a swath of desert in the country’s south long associated with poverty, drought, famine — and coal.

Now, with some help from China, it could soon power the country.

Zachary Davies Boren, Greenpeace, April 27, 2017

China’s coal-to-chemical industry could produce CO2 emissions in excess of 400 million tonnes a year by the end of the decade — a more than fourfold increase from the 90 million emitted in 2015.

Coal-to-chemical projects, which convert coal to other chemical properties, including oil and gas, are extremely carbon intensive, accounting for roughly 3% of the country’s total CO2 emissions in 2012.

Keith Bradsher, New York Times, November 29, 2016

JINCHENG, China — America’s uncertain stance toward global warming under the coming administration of Donald J.

Nagraj Adve, The Wire, November 19, 2016

Donald Trump’s being elected the 45th President of the US has sent shock waves through the climate change community worldwide. Examining some recent energy and emission trends in the US would contribute to our understanding of what Trump might or might not undo. And while our initial shock and dismay is totally warranted, it would be short-sighted of us to ignore deeper drivers of global warming that will persist even after Trump comes and goes.

Carimah Townes and Alejandro Davila Fragoso, Think Progress, June 25, 2016

Mitch Whitaker remembers well when Letcher County, Kentucky was booming with mining jobs. In fact, coal mines like the one near the land that Whitaker’s family has owned for generations made the town so busy that miners had three shifts running through the day.

“Everything was booming,” the 55-year-old environmentalist told ThinkProgress.

David Roberts, Vox, February 28, 2016

The US coal mining industry is collapsing.

Consider this remarkable fact, from a new report by the Rhodium Group:

The four largest US miners by output (Peabody Energy, Arch Coal, Cloud Peak Energy, and Alpha Natural Resources), which account for nearly half of US production, were worth a combined $34 billion at their peak in 2011. Today they are worth $150 million.

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