Climate Science

Chelsea Harvey, Washington Post, July 26, 2017

Even if we meet our most ambitious climate goal — keeping global temperatures within a strict 1.5 degrees Celsius (or 2.7 degree Fahrenheit) of their preindustrial levels — there will still be consequences, scientists say. And they’ll last for years after we stop emitting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

John Atcheson, Common Dreams, July 24, 2017

I worked for over 35 years in the environmental field, and one of the central debates I encountered was whether to "tell it like it is," and risk spreading doom and gloom, or to focus on a more optimistic message, even when optimism wasn't necessarily warranted.

Barry Saxifrage, National Observer, July 13, 2017

To address the twin threats of climate change and ocean acidification, nearly every nation has promised to reduce fossil fuel burning.

But so far, humanity keeps burning ever more. Last year we did it again, burning an all-time record amount.

Paul Beckwith, Youtube, July 23, 2017

The controversy over the accuracy of the New York Magazine article "The Uninhabited Earth" expands and deepens. Sixteen scientists examined and commented on the article, and gave it a low rating for "scientific accuracy" on the website climatefeedback.org; normally I agree with ratings from this great website, but NOT in this case.

Michael Mann, The Real News, July 23, 2017

Dr. Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Meteorology at Penn State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Geosciences and the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI). He is also director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).


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Michael Slezak, The Guardian, July 20, 2017

June 2017 was beaten only by June in 2015 and 2016, leaving experts with little hope for limiting warming to 1.5C or even 2C

Last month was the third-hottest June on record globally, temperature data suggest, confirming 2017 will almost certainly make a hat-trick of annual climate records, with 2015, 2016 and 2017 being the three hottest years since records began.

David Wallace-Wells, Daily Intelligencer, July 19, 2017
This week, to accompany our cover story on worst-case climate scenarios, we’re publishing a series of extended interviews with climatologists on the subject — most of them from the “godfather generation” of scientists who first raised the alarm about global warming several decades ago.
David Wallace-Wells, Daily Intelligencer, July 19, 2017

This week, to accompany our cover story on worst-case climate scenarios, we’re publishing a series of extended interviews with climatologists on the subject — most of them from the “godfather generation” of scientists who first raised the alarm about global warming several decades ago.

James Hansen et.al., Earth Systems Dynamics, July 18, 2017

Read this new paper at: http://www.earth-syst-dynam.net/8/577/2017/esd-8-577-2017-discussion.html

Conclusions include:

1. Global warming in the past 50 years has raised global temperature (Fig. 1) well above the prior range of the Holocene (the current interglacial period approximatly the 11,700 years) to the level of the Eemian period (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) when sea level was 6-9 meters (20-30 feet) higher than today.

Tim Radford, climate news network, July 10, 2017

Some puzzles, like the climate hiatus, may seem entirely academic. But they do answer big questions about long-term warming predictions.

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