Protest - Revolt

Brian Ward, The Nation, September 23, 2016

A sea of thousands of Native Americans from over 200 indigenous nations has descended onto the Great Plains to stand at the forefront of a new but familiar battle against fossil fuels.

John Abraham, The Guardian, September 21, 2016

Yesterday, 375 of the world’s top scientists, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, published an open letter regarding climate change. In the letter, the scientists report that the evidence is clear: humans are causing climate change. We are now observing climate change and its affect across the globe.

Paul Street, Among the Pipeline Fighters in Central Iowa, September 8, 2016

“There is a time,” Mario Savio famously said just more than half a century ago, “when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part; you can’t even passively take part, and you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop.”

That’s easier said than done, but you’ve got to make a start.

John Foran, Resilience, August 20, 2016

The challenge is greater than preparing individuals and groups to fight back. The real point is to connect those groups to one another – to break issue silos, share experience and resources, find common goals and targets, and lay the foundation for a network of front-line groups fighting together for social, political, economic, and ecological justice in the United States and the world.

Yes. It’s big. The crises are deep, the systems that birthed them are powerful, and the challenge is great. But we are confident.

Michael Gasser, Santa Cruz Ecological Justice, August 22, 2016

In a new article in the New Republic, 350.org founder Bill McKibben, probably the world’s most influential climate activist, argues that World War III has begun and that the enemy is climate change.

Elliot Sperber, Counterpunch, August 22, 2016

Across the USA, people from all types of backgrounds marinate for hours each day in the glow of nationalistic and militaristic news reports and entertainment. From the reverence directed toward its historical wars, to the imaginary wars featured in the entertainment industry, to the virtual wars of drone strikes (which blend politics and entertainment into ideological indistinction), glorification of war is ubiquitous. But though it may be amplified by the pervasiveness and invasiveness of social media, this philopolemia is hardly new.

Tom Fletcher, Northern View, July 19, 2016

Amanda Stanley, “science program officer” for the Seattle-based Wilberforce Foundation, headed up to Prince Rupert a couple of weeks ago to check on one of her projects.

That would be the camp on Lelu Island where a splinter group of Tsimshian tribal members and supporters maintain an effort to blockade and disrupt testing required for an environmental permit application to construct a liquefied natural gas terminal.

Lili Fuhr, Thomas Fatheuer & Barbara Unmüßig, The Ecologist, July 19, 2016

The idea that our profit-oriented, growth-driven economic system can deliver a sustainable society is a beguiling one, write Lili Fuhr, Thomas Fatheuer & Barbara Unmüßig. But it is doomed to failure. The changes we need are in the first place political, and will be driven by a new democratic will to put people and planet before money.

Margaret Klein Salamon, The Climate Mobilization, July 18, 2016

Imagine there is a fire in your house. What do you do? What do you think about?

You do whatever you can to try to put out the fire or exit the house.  You make a plan about how you can put out the fire, or how you can best exit the house.

Your senses are heightened, you are focused like a laser, and you put your entire self into your actions. You enter emergency mode.

Carimah Townes and Alejandro Davila Fragoso, Think Progress, June 25, 2016

Mitch Whitaker remembers well when Letcher County, Kentucky was booming with mining jobs. In fact, coal mines like the one near the land that Whitaker’s family has owned for generations made the town so busy that miners had three shifts running through the day.

“Everything was booming,” the 55-year-old environmentalist told ThinkProgress.

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