Pollution

Will Johnson, Nelson Star, July 5, 2015

Last week I took my partner Darby out for dinner to celebrate our four-year anniversary. It was a clear Monday evening—the sky baby blue and cloudless—and we were halfway through our first drink when the air suddenly seemed charged with an icy electricity. Tree limbs overhead rustled frenetically, then we heard rumbling in the distance.

Jennifer Baker, Revolution News, July 1, 2015

Shanghai – Anti Pollution protests against the construction of a new PX plant continue to grow in the Shanghai suburb of Jinshui.  The protest that began on Monday doubled in size Thursday night when approximately 5000 people filled the streets to re-affirm their opposition.

Along with the massive night time march, large groups of people have maintained a protest outside of the Jinshui District Government building since Monday.

Michelle Chen, The Nation, June 24, 2015
recycling

The green economy was chugging along at the Nevada paper recycling plant that morning in June 2012, feeding an oversized mound of waste toward a conveyor belt. But when the machine got jammed, the worker who tried to unclog it suddenly got flattened by a 2.5-ton mass of paper. A coworker rushed to extract him using a front-end loader, but, according to a government report, the worker died at the hospital two days later, smothered by the dead trees he had been tasked with salvaging.

Richard Smith, Truthout, June 24, 2015
Beijing

This article seeks to explain why China's environmental crisis is so horrific, so much worse than "normal" capitalism most everywhere else, and why the government is incapable of suppressing pollution even from its own industries. I begin with an overview of the current state of China's environment: its polluted air, waters, farmland and the proximate causes, including overproduction, overdevelopment, profligate resource consumption, uncontrolled dumping and venting of pollutants.

Richard Smith, Truthout, June 24, 2015
Beijing

This article seeks to explain why China's environmental crisis is so horrific, so much worse than "normal" capitalism most everywhere else, and why the government is incapable of suppressing pollution even from its own industries. I begin with an overview of the current state of China's environment: its polluted air, waters, farmland and the proximate causes, including overproduction, overdevelopment, profligate resource consumption, uncontrolled dumping and venting of pollutants.

Joan McKiernan, Socialist Worker, March 31, 2015
Seneca Lake

CAMPAIGNERS OPPOSING gas storage in the Finger Lakes region of New York welcomed the decision of local courts to dismiss all charges against the hundreds who have been arrested for protesting against a proposed gas storage facility in this area better known for tourism and wineries.

Ed Vulliamy, The Guardian, March 28, 2015
Diamond miners

Index on Censorship could not have awarded one of its Freedom of Expression prizes more estimably than to Angolan reporter Rafael Marques de Morais. In doing so, Index prises open Marques’s principal discourse: the prising open of the land itself by those who plunder for profit without heed.

Conor Gaffey, Newsweek, March 26, 2015
Beijing pollution

Beijing is closing its last major coal power station next year in an attempt to tackle air pollution which is costing the economy more than 10% of its GDP.

Clara Zwickl, The Real News, March 19, 2015
Pollution

JESSICA DESVARIEUX, TRNN PRODUCER: Welcome to The Real News Network. I am Jessica Desvarieux in Baltimore.

A new report has been released measuring environmental inequality. Researchers looked at industrial air pollution exposure in the United States across all 50 states and compared exposure based on race and economics. The report is titled Three Measures of Environmental Inequality.

Elizabeth Grossman, National Geographic, March 6, 2015
Hormones

Exposure to hormone-disrupting chemicals is likely leading to an increased risk of serious health problems costing at least $175 billion (U.S.) per year in Europe alone, according to a study published Thursday.

Chemicals that can mimic or block estrogen or other hormones are commonly found in thousands of products around the world, including plastics, pesticides, furniture, and cosmetics.

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