LNG - Fracking

Margaret Munro, Postmedia News, February 14, 2014

The vast network of natural gas wells, pipes and processing facilities across the U.S. and Canada is “leaky” and needs a fix, according to a new study. Government authorities are  underestimating how much methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is escaping into the atmosphere from the natural gas system, says the report, entitled Methane Leaks from North American Natural Gas Systems, that was released Thursday by journal Science.
 

Staff, CP, February 6, 2014

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — British Columbia Premier Christy Clark plugged her vision for an economy fuelled by liquefied natural gas during a speech Thursday to California's senate. Clark told senators that exporting LNG, which she described as the cleanest fossil fuel, to Asia would create jobs, investment opportunities and eliminate the debt in her province. She said the LNG industry will be the biggest step B.C. has taken to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions and growing its economy responsibly.

Marc Lee, Vancouver Sun, January 30, 2014

Is British Columbia “doing the world a favour,” as Premier Christy Clark put it, by developing a liquefied natural gas export industry? Or is this just wishful thinking from a government that has abandoned its law on reducing carbon emissions to pursue LNG riches?

Roger Annis, Vancouver Observer, January 28, 2014

The company seeking to build the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline has had a massive explosion on its decades-old natural gas pipeline in southern Manitoba. The rupture of the TransCanada PipeLines (TCPL) gas line occurred in the middle of the night on Saturday, January 25 near the village of Otterburne. A massive fireball erupted into the night sky and burned for many hours.

Mark Hume, Globe and Mail, January 28, 2014
Site C dam

The closing remarks to a federal-provincial panel examining BC Hydro’s Site C proposal were made by a grey-haired native leader who said bands in the area are determined not to let the dam get built. Treaty 8 Tribal Chief Liz Logan told the Joint Review Panel, which wrapped up five weeks of public hearings on Friday, that Peace River native communities hope a treaty they signed over 100 years ago to protect their way of life will be honoured and the dam, which would flood more than 5,000 hectares in the valley, will not be allowed.

Judith Cockman, judithfire.com, December 17, 2013

In Alberta, Ronalie and Shawn Campbell’s previously excellent well water is now saturated with methane, ethane, propane, butane and isobutane.  The trees flanking their well – which is surrounded by over 50 energy wells within a one mile radius  – have died.  Jessica Ernst is heavy-lifting a $33 million lawsuit against Encana /Alberta Environment / and the Energy Resources Conservation Board.  Her skin burns and develops rash when she showers.  Not that she can do that anymore.  But she can light her water on fire.

Mark Hume, Globe and Mail, January 23, 2014

The BC government is pressing for a quick go-ahead of the massive, Site C dam on the Peace River in northeast BC. The dam will help power proposed expansions of mining, gas fracking and other extraction and related projects in the BC north. It will flood 3,000 hectares (7,500 acres) of prime agricultural land. The government wants to bypass a review of such a controversial decision. Now the review panel appointed by the government says it will hear concerns about this aspect of the dam proposal.--Website editors

Alison Bailie, The Tyee, January 13, 2014
LNG infographic

This month, provincial MLAs are preparing for the upcoming legislative session, in which they will debate rules for carbon pollution and taxes for liquefied natural gas (LNG) development. The connection between LNG development and carbon pollution is significant. And just how the government chooses to manage both issues will have serious long-term implications, for the province and the country. Last year, Minister of Natural Gas Development Rich Coleman was asked on CBC's Early Edition what B.C.'s LNG plans could mean for the province's climate targets.

Gary Park, Petroleum News, January 11, 2014
fort nelson first nation

Existing in an almost tranquil atmosphere compared with the uproar surrounding plans to build crude bitumen pipelines to the Pacific Coast, British Columbia’s LNG sector may be in for a jolt. A small aboriginal community, with only 800 residents, is locking horns with the British Columbia government and the industry over the use of water for hydraulic fracturing.

Jeff Rubin, Globe and Mail, December 19, 2013
BClng

In the lifespan of multibillion dollar projects, five years is a relative blink. It’s why committing to big infrastructure projects is so nerve-wracking–the world can change in a hurry. Consider that only five years ago, plans were in place to build a terminal outside Quebec City to receive liquefied natural gas from Russia. At the time, natural gas prices were close to double digits and the skies ahead looked clear and profitable. The shale gas revolution, of course, changed that essentially overnight.

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