Key Articles

Brian Collier and Richard Atkinson, International Socialists, June 11, 2014

This conference was held under the auspices of Socialist Resistance (SR) and Revolutionary Socialism in the 21st Century (rs21) and was a model of revolutionary cooperation on the ground.  It consisted of opening and closing plenaries, with two sessions of four simultaneous workshops either side of (a rather late) lunch.  There was a good variety of speakers on offer from the two sponsoring organisations, obviously, but also from the

Alexandre Costa, International Viewpoint, April 29, 2014

Last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change started the publication of its 5th Assessment Report (or AR5), initially showing the work by the Working Group I, which deals with the physical basis of climate change. Now, the AR5 process continued with the publication of the “Summary for Policy Makers” by the Working Group II, concerning “impacts, adaptation and vulnerability.”

Christian Parenti, New Politics, February 17, 2014
Christian Parenti

I am going to discuss the political implications of climate change as regards the role of the state. The punch line is this: climate change means that the state is coming back. The choice is whether the state’s return will be violent and repressive or whether its return can involve a renovation and transformation that enhances the state’s progressive and democratic features.

Michael Lowy, New Politics, February 7, 2014
canadiandimension.com

Ecosocialism is an attempt to provide a radical, civilizational alternative to capitalism, rooted in the basic arguments of the ecological movement, and in the Marxist critique of political economy. It opposes to capitalism’s destructive progress (Marx) an economic policy founded on non-monetary and extra-economic criteria: social needs and ecological equilibrium.

Chris Hedges, TruthOut, January 27, 2014
Chris Hedges

The most prescient portrait of the American character and our ultimate fate as a species is found in Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick.” Melville makes our murderous obsessions, our hubris, violent impulses, moral weakness and inevitable self-destruction visible in his chronicle of a whaling voyage. He is our foremost oracle. He is to us what William Shakespeare was to Elizabethan England or Fyodor Dostoyevsky to czarist Russia.

VESG, Vancouver Observer, January 17, 2014
Santa delivers lumps of coal

ILWU Canada President Mark Gordienko announced December 20  on the waterfront union's website and in the mainstream media the offer of a "$2,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of masked intruders who violently occupied Port Metro Vancouver’s office on Mon

Richard Smith, ThruthOut, January 9, 2014
Jared Rodriguez Truthout

In what scientists have called "The Great Acceleration," the engine of global capitalist economic development since 1950 has now engulfed nearly the whole world and accelerated at an ever-faster speed, overwhelming our small blue planet's finite natural resources and limited ability to withstand pollution in a last great fire sale of global upper and middle-class overconsumption.

Chris Hedges, Socialist Worker, January 13, 2011

THE CORPORATE forces that are looting the Treasury and have plunged us into a depression will not be contained by the two main political parties. The Democratic and Republican parties have become little more than squalid clubs of privilege and wealth, whores to money and corporate interests, hostage to a massive arms industry, and so adept at deception and self-delusion they no longer know truth from lies.

Albert Einstein, Monthly Review, January 1, 2014

The economic anarchy of capitalist society as it exists today is, in my opinion, the real source of the evil. We see before us a huge community of producers the members of which are unceasingly striving to deprive each other of the fruits of their collective labor -- not by force, but on the whole in faithful compliance with legally established rules.

Chris Williams, Socialist Worker, December 5, 2013
Violence against our environment

Both the words “environment” and “violence” have so many meanings, that they require some definition of how they can be of use in the context of a struggle for social justice. Regarding the word violence, according to Merriam Webster, one definition is “the use of brute strength to cause harm to a person or property”; a definition that doesn’t seem to have an immediately obvious connection to ecological issues associated with climate change, loss of biodiversity and various forms of pollution.

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