First Nations/Indigenous

Apr 14 2014 - 15:00
Author: 
Sakej

Since the 1990 Kanehsatà:ke Siege or the 1990 “Oka Crisis”, the term “warrior” has been bantered around liberally to refer to those who protest, protectors of the land, those who speak out publicly against oppressive colonial laws and, in particular, those who are arrested during protests.  ’Warrior’ seems to have become an overused word in the Indigenous resistance movement. There are various connotations to this word within Indigenous languages, but it is important to note the interpretation of this word by the authorities.

Defining The Warrior - Idle No More - West Coast Native News
May 9 2012 - 12:00
Author: 
Ta'Kaiya Blaney

Wednesday May 9 2012- West Coast First Nations 'Yinka Dene Alliance Freedom Riders' and community supporters gathered in front of the Enbridge's annual general meeting of shareholders at the King Edward Hotel here in downtown Toronto,to send a clear message of disapproval for Enbridge's plan to build pipelines and oil sands through out Sacred First Nations territory. Led by 11 year old activist/ singer from vancouver Ta'Kaiya Blaney. The Yinka Dene Alliance is one of the leading groups of First Nations in opposing the Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipeline and super-tanker project.

11 Year old Ta'Kaiya Blaney leads Enbridge pipeline protest in #toronto
Apr 14 2014 - 12:00
Author: 
PacificWildLive

t's one of the last bastions of Canadian wilderness: the Great Bear Rainforest, on BC's north and central Pacific coast. Home to humpback whales, wild salmon, wolves, grizzlies, and the legendary spirit bear - this spectacular place is now threatened by a proposal from Enbridge to bring an oil pipeline and supertankers to this fragile and rugged coast.

Oil in Eden: The Battle to Protect Canada's Pacific Coast
Oct 8 2013 - 11:45
Author: 
Kahsatstenhsera

Kahsatstenhsera gah-sad-sdanh-se-ra is a Kanienkeha:ka (Mohawk) word that means Strength in Unity. This short documentary details contemporary Indigenous resistance to tar sands pipeline expansion, in particular the Line 9 and Energy East pipelines, which threaten the health of our territories in the northeast of Turtle Island. It includes the voices and perspectives of Dene, Wolastiqiyik, Mi'kmaq, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and Wet'suwet'en land defenders. www.reclaimturtleisland.com

Kahsatstenhsera: Indigenous Resistance to Tar Sands Pipelines
Oct 13 2013 - 11:45
Author: 
Aljazeera

The tar sands region of the Canadian Province of Alberta has proved a lucrative, and controversial, source of oil for the US market. A remote stretch of highway in the US state of Idaho has become a choke point for tar sands machinery, threatening to cost big oil companies billions of dollars. The fight against megaloads, activists believe, is also a fight against the ecological damage in the tar sands region of Alberta. Many also believe it's a blow in the battle to stop man-made climate change Al Jazeera's Rob Reynolds reports from Idaho.

Native Americans battle corporates in Idaho
Apr 14 2014 - 11:30
Author: 
Elsipogtog

We go to Mi'kmaq territory in New Brunswick, Canada, to find out what happens when a First Nation says no to fracking.

Fault Lines - Elsipogtog: The Fire Over Water
Nov 16 2013 - 11:30
Author: 
Togestiy

Freda Huson and Toghestiy from the Unist'ot'en Camp speak about the threat of, and resistance to, fracking to thousands of people gathered for the Defend Our Climate -- Defend Our Communities rally at Science World in Vancouver. The rally in Vancouver was mainly focused on the Enbridge tar sands bitumen pipeline - which will pass right by the Unist'ot'en Camp if it is ever built.

Unist'ot'en Camp Speakers on Fracking at Defend Our Climate Rally - Vancouver Nov. 16 2013
Feb 19 2014 - 09:45
Author: 
Gwynne Dyer

… In a recent interview with The Guardian while she was visiting Norway, [newly elected Prime Minister] Aleqa Hammond said: “The shock will be profound. But we have faced colonisation, epidemics and modernisation before. The decisions we are making (to open the country up to mining and oil exploitation) will have enormous impact on lifestyles and our indigenous culture. But we always come out on top. We are vulnerable, but we know how to adapt.”

Feb 11 2014 - 18:00
Author: 
Derrick Penner

Between an increase in mining exploration work and development of a potential liquefied natural gas export industry, British Columbia’s First Nations are heavily engaged in consultations over resource projects in the province. It puts the First Nations Energy and Mining Council, an aboriginal-created advisory body, in an important position at a critical time for aboriginal communities, both in terms of managing the impact of resource projects and realizing benefits. “We need (the council),” said Ed John, Grand Chief of the B.C.

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