Coal

VESG, Vancouver Observer, January 17, 2014
Santa delivers lumps of coal

ILWU Canada President Mark Gordienko announced December 20  on the waterfront union's website and in the mainstream media the offer of a "$2,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of masked intruders who violently occupied Port Metro Vancouver’s office on Mon

Roger Annis, Vancouver Observer, January 13, 2014

Seven cars of a 152-car coal train moving along CN Rail tracks through Vancouver region derailed two days ago in Burnaby. Three of the cars tipped over and spilled their loads, contaminated the waters of a stream flowing into Burnaby Lake where conservationists have worked for decades to restore the water and spawning salmon from the effects of industrial pollution and urbanization.

 

Trish Kahle , Socialist Worker, January 13, 2014

Imagine yourself in the rugged countryside of the Appalachian Mountains, where you and your neighbors have lived with a history of poverty and lack of economic development--and you learn that the water piped into you home has been poisoned and can't be used, even after it is boiled, until further notice.

Roger Annis, Vancouver Observer, January 12, 2014
Photo by Kevin Washbrook

Seven cars of a 152-car coal train moving along CN Rail tracks through Vancouver region derailed yesterday in Burnaby. Three of the cars tipped over and spilled their loads, contaminated the waters of a stream flowing into Burnaby Lake where conservationists have worked for decades to restore the water and spawning salmon from the effects of industrial pollution and urbanization. A sign posted on a protective fence at the creek by Fisheries and Oceans Canada says the waterway is considered a sensitive fish and wildlife habitat and that the area is protected.

Ari Phillips, Climate Progress, January 8, 2014

The Gateway Pacific Terminal, near Bellingham, Washington, is poised to become the West Coast’s biggest coal export project — but it will no longer have the backing of New York-based, international banking behemoth Goldman Sachs. On Tuesday, Goldman Sachs sold its stock back to the companies proposing to build the terminal, which would transport 48 million tons of coal from Wyoming to Asia annually. Goldman Sachs had a 49 percent stake in the Gateway Pacific project before dropping out.

Joseph Leivdal, Georgia Straight, December 18, 2013
coal action

On Monday (December 16), six “anti-capitalist” Santas from the activist group Rising Tide delivered coal to the private offices of “naughty” Port Metro Vancouver. PMV is reviewing the permit application and consultation process for the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks coal port development. This project would see the delivery of at least four million tonnes of coal by train, and then open barge to Texada Island, to be loaded onto ships and sold to Asia.

Maryam Adrangi, Occupy.com, December 17, 2013
Westcoast coal terminal

Vancouver and Coast Salish Territories, British Columbia — No less than 80% of Canada’s coal exports are shipped through British Columbia, and export terminals in the Lower Mainland received over $1 billion earlier this year to improve transport efficiency and capacity. Now, a new proposal for coal export from the Fraser Surrey Docks (FSD) terminal has raised the alarm bells for local residents.

Rising Tide, Vancouver, Coast Salish Territories, December 13, 2013
Coal Oil Gas - None Shall Pass

VANCOUVER, COAST SALISH TERRITORIES – This morning, activists with Rising Tide-Vancouver, Coast Salish Territories dropped a banner reading “Coal, Oil, Gas: None Shall Pass” outside Port Metro Vancouver’s head office at Canada Place, in opposition to the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks coal terminal. “This coal export project is part of a push to make BC a gateway to profits for the fossil fuel industry.

Roger Annis, VESG, December 13, 2013
Mayor Dianne Watts of Surrey and Mayor Wayne Baldwin of White Rock, photo Roger Annis

First published in the Vancouver Observer, Dec 5, 2013

The city councils of Surrey and White Rock say they are keenly interested in a relocation inland of the railway line that runs along their ocean shorelines. That message was welcomed by most of the 400-plus people attending a public forum on the topic that the two councils hosted at the Pacific Inn in south Surrey on Nov 26.

The forum featured Surrey mayor Dianne Watts and White Rock mayor Wayne Baldwin. Each was given much applause when they declared that it’s time to move the line inland.

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