Climate Justice

Eli Day, In These Times, October 28, 2017

When Terry Melvin was a boy in Lackawanna, N.Y., an afternoon siren would occasionally ring out, warning the city’s mostly black residents to the avalanche of red soot that would soon explode from the mouth of Bethelem Steel and blanket the city. But before making landfall, the thick dust would build a home in the lungs of whomever toiled inside the Bethlehem plant. Over the years, cancer would sink its teeth into many of the factory’s workers, including both of Melvin’s grandfathers.

Geeta Anand and Vikram Singh, New York Times, October 28, 2017

See this amazing visual tour through the lives of India Villagers facing extreme climate impacts. "Hotter temperatures are forcing families in southern India to decide: Try to survive here, or leave?"

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/26/world/asia/10000000549535...

Ragina Johnson and Nicole Colson, Socialist Worker, October 23, 2017

THE DEADLIEST wildfires in the state's history ripped through large areas in Northern California this month, terrorizing residents, causing mass evacuations, and leaving behind catastrophic destruction.

Julian Hayda, Jerome McDonnell, WBEZ91.5Chicago, September 5, 2017

When the National Weather Service called Hurricane Harvey an “unprecedented” event with unknown impacts, people only needed to look at 2005’s Hurricane Katrina or 2012’s Hurricane Sandy see what communities would likely be affected the most. 

K. Jessica Hsu and Mark Schuller, HuffPost, September 5, 2017

Yes, to not ask questions about climate change is indeed dumb, as Senator Sanders pointed out.

Talli Nauman, Native Sun News, September 5, 2017

FARGO, N. D. –– The Fortune 500 company answerable for building the Dakota Access Pipeline across unceded 1851 Ft. Laramie Treaty territory is seeking $1 billion in damages in a new lawsuit against organized opposition involved with the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux Nation) struggle to block the private oil infrastructure project.

Ben Walker, Inside Climate News, August 25, 2017

Cupped in the Bolivian highlands that border Chile, the small village is littered by centuries of conquest and expansion: from the pre-Incas, who ringed the surrounding hills with protective fortresses, to the gold-hungry Spanish conquistadors drawn to the region's mineral wealth.

But after centuries of settlement, Santiago K has become a ghost town. Drought, debt and climate change have squeezed roughly 80 percent of Santiago's residents from their homes in search of work and a better life.

John Abraham, The Guardian, August 24, 2017

Humans are causing Earth’s climate to change. We know that. We’ve known it for decades. Okay so what? The follow-up questions should be directed to what the effects of warming will be. What will the costs be to society, to the natural biosystem, and to human lives? Let’s be honest, if the consequences of warming are not large, then who cares? But, if the consequences are severe, then we should take action now to reduce the warming. This really comes down to costs and benefits. Are the benefits of reducing emissions greater or less than the costs?

Jacqueline Patterson and Bill McKibben, Yes Magazine, August 24, 2017

There’s nothing like the giant oil companies to provide us all with lessons about power and prejudice.

Raj Mankad, TexasMonthly, August 20, 2017

This article originally appeared in Grist.

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