Climate Change

Gwynne Dyer, Georgia Straight, February 17, 2014
Drivers cope with hazardous conditions during the 2014 polar vortex.  Elena Elisseeva / Shutterstock.com

The standard climate change predictions said that people in the tropics and the sub-tropics would be badly hurt by global warming long before the people living in the temperate zones, farther away from the equator, were feeling much pain at all. That was unfair, because it was the people of the rich countries in the temperate zone—North America, Europe, and Japan, mainly—who industrialised early and started burning large amounts of fossil fuel as long as two centuries ago. That’s how they got rich.

By Laura Poppick, Live Science, February 18, 2014

Melting Arctic sea ice has contributed considerably more to warming at the top of the world than previously predicted by climate models, according to a new analysis of 30 years of satellite observations…

Roger Annis, Vancouver Observer, February 13, 2014
Rail line washed out at Dawlish, England

England is experiencing the worst flooding since the catastrophic flood of 1953. December and January saw the heaviest rainfall since record keeping began in 1910. More heavy rains and storms are forecast in the weeks to come...

The flooding is coming from all sources--tidal flooding from the ocean and tidal rivers; fluvial flooding from rivers bursting their banks or overflowing; groundwater flooding from saturation of the earth; and flash flooding by sudden, heavy rainfall.

Bruce Cheadle, Canadian Press, February 13, 2014

OTTAWA - Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's latest federal budget dedicates all of five pages to "conserving Canada's natural heritage" — with measures such as resurfacing the Trans-Canada Highway through a national park and building more snowmobile trails. Critics cite the absence of the words "climate change" in the 400-plus page document as evidence that the government has "just given up on the environment."

Michael Roberts, Blog, February 12, 2014

The world is experiencing extreme weather.  In the US, California’s drought is the worst in 100-years while the East Coast faced a massive snowstorm with freezing temperatures. On the other side of the world, Australia continues to deal with intense summer heat and droughts, causing major bush fires. There has been severe winter flooding in the UK and Europe; extreme cold and snow in the Eastern US and Japan and so on.

Andy Atkins, The Guardian Environment Blog, February 12, 2014
Prime minister David Cameron speaks as he chairs the government's Cobra emergency meeting on flooding. Photograph: Neil Hall/PA

“We are seeing more abnormal weather events. Colleagues across the House can argue about whether that is linked to climate change or not. I very much suspect that it is,” David Cameron told MPs last month.

Jeffrey Simpson, Globe and Mail, February 7, 2014

... Recently, the [Canadian] government was obliged to submit Canada’s emissions outlook until 2030 to the United Nations. It was a long, detailed report, the most thorough done in recent years, a credit to those who prepared it and an indispensable document for anyone interested in the issue.

Predictably, because the report contained information the government did not want to receive wide publicity, it was not put on a website, was not accompanied by a press release and would have otherwise been ignored had alert environmentalists not tipped off a few reporters.

Victor Lipman, Forbes, February 4, 2014

Two recent communications from respected global organizations have underscored the long-term impacts of climate change – and the potential vast effects on business. Communiques from the World Bank and the United Nations both highlighted the complex, long-lasting and extraordinarily costly nature of the problem.

David Robert Grimes, The Guardian, February 5, 2014
Burying your head in the sand does not qualify as scientific scepticism. Photograph: Daniel Karmann/DPA/Corbis

The grim findings of the IPCC last year reiterated what climatologists have long been telling us: the climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, and we're to blame. Despite the clear scientific consensus, a veritable brigade of self-proclaimed, underinformed armchair experts lurk on comment threads the world over, eager to pour scorn on climate science. Barrages of ad hominem attacks all too often await both the scientists working in climate research and journalists who communicate the research findings.

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